Do the Lipid-nano particles (LNPs) (fatty transport vehicle) that encase the Malone, Kariko, Weissman et al. mRNA technology that is the basis for the COVID gene vaccine (Moderna & Pfizer) cross the

by Paul Alexander

placenta & is found in breast milk? Does it go systemically all over the body and NOT stay in the injection site? Yes, Yes to all, and these mRNA technology inventors knew it & stayed silent! CRIMINAL

SOURCE:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0143400415300679?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

 

Our findings suggest that nanoparticles can cross the placenta and be taken up by fetal organs. Certain concentrations of carboxylate-modified polystyrene nanoparticles may be cytotoxic to trophoblasts, which could alter placental function.’

SOURCE:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S027869152100836X

‘Our data illustrated that maternal PS-NPs exposure in pregnancy and lactation resulted in a decline in birth and postnatal body weight in offspring mice. Furthermore, high-dose PS-NPs reduced liver weight, triggered oxidative stress, caused inflammatory cell infiltration, up-regulated proinflammatory cytokine expression, and disturbed glycometabolism in the liver of male offspring mice. In addition, pre- and postnatal PS-NPs exposure diminished testis weight, disrupted seminiferous epithelium and decreased sperm count in mouse offspring. Moreover, PS-NPs induced testicular oxidative injury, as presented by increased malondialdehyde generation and altered superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the testis of offspring mice. These findings declared that maternal exposure to PS-NPs in pregnancy and lactation can cause hepatic and testicular toxicity in male mouse pups, which put forward new understanding into the detrimental effects of nanoplastics on mammalian offspring.’

SOURCE:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12989-020-00386-8?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

‘We included 73 studies on placental translocation of particles, of which 21 in vitro/ex vivo studies, 50 animal studies, and 2 human studies on transplacental particle transfer. This systematic review shows that (i) (ultra)fine particles and engineered nanoparticles can bypass the placenta and reach fetal units as observed for all the applied models irrespective of the species origin (i.e., rodent, rabbit, or human) or the complexity (i.e., in vitro, ex vivo, or in vivo), (ii) particle size, particle material, dose, particle dissolution, gestational stage of the model, and surface composition influence maternal-fetal translocation, and (iii) no simple, standardized method for nanoparticle detection and/or quantification in biological matrices is available to date. Existing evidence, research gaps, and perspectives of maternal-fetal particle transfer are highlighted.’

SOURCE:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11654-3

‘Particle transfer across the placenta has been suggested but to date, no direct evidence in real-life, human context exists. Here we report the presence of black carbon (BC) particles as part of combustion-derived particulate matter in human placentae using white-light generation under femtosecond pulsed illumination. BC is identified in all screened placentae, with an average (SD) particle count of 0.95 × 104 (0.66 × 104) and 2.09 × 104 (0.9 × 104) particles per mm3 for low and high exposed mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the placental BC load is positively associated with mothers’ residential BC exposure during pregnancy (0.63–2.42 µg per m3). Our finding that BC particles accumulate on the fetal side of the placenta suggests that ambient particulates could be transported towards the fetus and represents a potential mechanism explaining the detrimental health effects of pollution from early life onwards.’

SOURCE:

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.12.22.521490v1?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

‘LNPs enhance mRNA stability, circulation time, cellular uptake, and preferential delivery to specific tissues compared to mRNA with no carrier platform. However, LNPs have yet to be developed for safe and effective mRNA delivery to the placenta as a method to treat placental dysfunction. Here, we develop LNPs that enable high levels of mRNA delivery to trophoblasts in vitro and to the placenta in vivo with no toxicity.’

SOURCE:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9992266/?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

‘Here, we engineered ionizable LNPs for mRNA delivery to the placenta with applications in mediating placental vasodilation.’