Raj et al.: "COVID-19 Vaccine-Associated Subclinical Axillary Lymphadenopathy on Screening Mammogram"; Vaccine Induced Axillary (swollen lymph nodes) Lymphadenopathy in women taking mRNA COVID jab

by Paul Alexander

13.2% women who got a Pfizer vaccine exhibited subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy compared to 9.5% of those who got Moderna vaccine. Only 1.2 % of those who did not receive vaccine had swollen lymph

‘Women who had an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine within a few weeks of mammography were more likely to present with subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy compared to those who had unilateral axillary sLAD but did not have a mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.’

‘Our results support the hypothesis that mRNA COVID-19 vaccinations result in a 267% increase in subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy compared to women who did not receive the vaccine.’

 

The findings from this study must be duplicated and studied closely as to the health implications to women and whether this vaccine-associated subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy swelling has pathological sequelae.

SOURCE:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34906409/

‘Background: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination may display subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy on screening mammography, which can appear suspicious for malignancy, leading to additional diagnostic evaluation.

Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy (sLAD) on screening mammogram in women who received either the first or second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech (Pfizer) or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines compared to women who have not.

Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved, HIPAA complaint study from 12/14/2020 to 4/14/2021, 1027 patients presented for screening mammography and met study inclusion criteria. Patients with history of baseline lymphadenopathy or prior cancer diagnosis were excluded.

Results: Of the 1027 women, 43 were recalled for unilateral sLAD. 34 women received a COVID-19 vaccination ipsilateral to the sLAD (Pfizer n=19, 44.2%; Moderna n=15, 34.9%), 9 did not (20.9%). Incidence of unilateral axillary sLAD was significantly higher (p-value<0.01) in those who received a COVID-19 vaccination within approximately 7 weeks preceding screening mammogram. 13.2% of patients who received the Pfizer vaccine and 9.5% of patients who received the Moderna vaccine developed sLAD. Moderna's vaccine elicited a more robust reaction in the elderly (Moderna 63.7 years vs. Pfizer 59.7 years). For both vaccines, sLAD resolved on average 46.5 days after the last COVID-19 vaccine (p=0.44).

Conclusion: Women who have received either mRNA COVID-19 vaccines may benefit from scheduling their screening mammogram before vaccination or consider delaying screening mammography 8 weeks. While Pfizer may have an overall more robust immune response, Moderna may elicit a stronger immune response in elderly women.

Summary: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination before screening mammography were significantly more likely to present with subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy than women who did not receive the vaccine.

Key results: 13.2% of women who received a Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine exhibited subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy compared to 9.5% of those who received the Moderna vaccine. Only 1.2 % of those who did not receive a vaccine presented with subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy. The average time of resolution of the lymphadenopathy on diagnostic mammogram was 46.5 days overall, with Pfizer-BioNTech taking 50.7 days and Moderna 41.5 days.’