tRNA (transfer RNA) is critical to the translation to proteins (e.g. spike protein) from mRNA & there are 3 STOP codons UGA, UAA, & UAG that function to stop the translation (protein synthesis);

by Paul Alexander

Did the swapping out of URACIL (the initial uridine) for a pseudouridine (Ψ) (methylated-pseudouridine) cause the translation (building) of spike protein to be non-stop (24/7) in all cells?

I share a study below that provokes me to ask a question for your comments:

The uracil/uridine in the first spot in the 3 stop codons UGA, UAA, & UAG (tells the ribosome to stop reading, translating the mRNA and thus stop building that specific protein) is replaced by methylated-pseudouridine that helps hide (mask) the mRNA from the immune system (from your body) so that it is not destroyed and can be stable and lasting. Similar type role of the LNP fatty lipid ball that encapsulates the mRNA. Thus would changing the ‘stop’ codons actual ‘code’ (what we call ‘triplet code’) mean theoretically that the mRNA can be read by the ribosomes constantly and be churning out spike protein non-stop, technically forever? If this is even partly correct, what are the implications to you who have taken the shot for Pfizer and Moderna did not conduct the proper safety studies especially long-term to examine this and the FDA failed in its regulatory role to protect Americans. The FDA never mandated and ensured that the vaccine makers like Pfizer conduct the right toxicity studies, teratogenicity studies, oncogenicity studies, pharmacodynamic studies, or pharmacokinetic studies.

 

‘However, modification of the initial uridine to a pseudouridine (Ψ) allows efficient recognition and read-through of these stop codons by a transfer RNA (tRNA), although it requires the formation of two normally forbidden purine-purine base pairs. Here we determined the crystal structure at 3.1 Å resolution of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with the anticodon stem loop of tRNA(Ser) bound to the ΨAG stop codon in the A site.’

SOURCE:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23812587/